The Ruler and the Rabble – or No Reform – No Reform.

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The Ruler and the Rabble – or No Reform – No Reform.
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A rare caricature. Charles Stewart Vane-Tempest, 3rd Marquis of Londonderry and brother of Lord Castlereagh leaps up overturning his chair, putting himself between his pretty young wife and a young nurse whom he pushes angrily towards the door. Frances Anne, Lady Londonderry, sits dandling a doll-like baby on her knee, wearing a dress with enormous puff sleeves and the high plumed hat, sabre and sabretache of the 10th Hussars (her husband was Colonel of the regiment and she frequently rode out with them in military style riding dress). She holds a cheque for £40 in one hand and pushes her husband forward with the other, encouraging him to Turn her out – down with her – am I not Commander ?.  The nurse, Mrs Thomas, retreats angrily towards the door, holding a cheque for £10 in her hand. A satire on Londonderry’s unpopularity as an opponent of Reform and the notorious Pap Spoon Case. Queen Adelaide had given £40 for the nurse of her goddaughter Lady Adelaide, born in January 1830. The Marquis had allegedly passed on £10 only and some incident had occurred over a baby’s feeding spoon, after which she sued him for assault and false imprisonment. The case of Thomas versus Londonderry came before the Court of Common Pleas in December 1831, but was settled out of court, the Marquis paying the defendant £70 plus costs.  After Castlereagh's suicide in 1822 the Marquessate and the family's Irish estates were inherited by his half brother, the soldier and eminent diplomat Charles Stewart. Stewart had married in 1823 as his second wife (whose surname Vane-Tempest he subsequently took) the heiress Frances Anne Vane-Tempest (d.1865), who had inherited vast Durham estates and collieries and her family seat of Wynyard Park. This enormous wealth was subsequently further increased when the Londonderry's bought the Seaham estate of Lord Byron's father-in-law (thus gaining a coastal outlet for their coal) and Frances Anne inherited in 1834 most of  the Co. Antrim property of her maternal grandfather the Marquis of Antrim. Wynyard was rebuilt for the Londonderrys by Philip William Wyatt in 1822-30, although it was partially destroyed by fire in 1841 and subsequently rebuilt. BM 16842.