Characteristic Sketches of the London Club Houses. a. The Amphibs. b. The Cheta. c. The Elephants. d. The Tigers.

Tags: Phillips (Sharpshooter).
Characteristic Sketches of the London Club Houses. a. The Amphibs. b. The Cheta. c. The Elephants. d. The Tigers.
Hover your mouse over to magnify
Uncoloured issues. A set of four plates illustrating the characteristics of the habitués of London clubs. Plate ‘a’ shows three men chatting on the pavement outside the pillared portico of the United Service Club in Pall Mall. Members were called ‘Amphibs’ because they were drawn from the Army and Navy. One is a shabbily dressed man with an eyepatch, on the left is a gentleman strongly resembling the Duke of Wellington while the other is evidently retired a army officer. The building was designed by John Nash in 1827-8 and was built on the site of demolished Carlton House (King George IV presented the club with his splendid staircase). Plate ‘b’ shows two drunken members of Crockfords standing on the front steps of the club. Crockfords, a private gambling club, was established at 50 St. James’s Street in 1828. Its founder William Crockford (once a fish seller of Temple Bar) died a millionairre in 1844, and the club was subsequently sold. The splendid building is now occupied by a casino. Plate ‘c’ shows two ancient, lecherous, ugly members of the Athenaeum. They bow to a pretty young woman who walks along the street. Founded in 1824 by John Wilson Croker at the Royal Society, and considered to be the most intellectually elite of all the clubs. The club moved to its present splendid building, designed by Decimus Burton, in 1830. Plate ‘d’ depicts three men, looking somewhat rough and ready, conversing on the pavement outside the Oriental Club at 18 Hanover Square. All three have canes and umbrellas which they carry at an aggressive angle. Founded in 1824 by Sir John Malcolm for ‘gentlemen who have travelled or resided in Asia, at St. Helena, in Egypt, at the Cape of Good Hope, the Mauritius, or at Constantinople; or whose official situations connect them with the administration of our Eastern government abroad or at home’. The clubhouse was built to the designs of Benjamin Dean Wyatt and Phillip Wyatt in 1827-8. It was sold in 1962 and has since (disgracefully) been demolished. The club has since moved to Stratford Place. Not in BM Cat.