Adulation or a Coronation Oration, by the George (scored through and replaced by) Jack Pudding of the Nation

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Adulation or a Coronation Oration, by the George (scored through and replaced by) Jack Pudding of the Nation
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George the fourth, crowned and with orb and sceptre, wits on a cornation chair in Westminster Abbey. The archbishop stands behind him, holding his mitre, his right hand on the chair. On the kings right hand stands Londonderry (Castlereagh) in Garter robes; other peers stand behind him. All watch the antics of Canning, dressed in parti-coloured clothes as a merry-andrew or buffoon. He kneels on the dais at the King’s feet, arms flung wide; at his feet is a high-crowned hat with a peacocks feather; on the back of his tunic are the letters MP and PC. He declaims: The delight of the Nation at the Celebration of your Majesty’s Coronation, the Exultation throughout the Creation exceeds all Imagination, the Expectation to which the Anticipation of this Consumation has given occasion is beyond Contemplation; we offer the Oblation of our Congratulation, without Hesitation or Trepidation; no Tribulation can effect Cessation of the Sensation which pervaids every Station; no Situation in whatever Depravation will utter an Execration for the Association are in Preparation to effect an Extirpation of all Defamation. We hope the Expectation of a Decollation will produce Annihialation of all Deviation from strict Regulation; we submit to Subjugation without Hesitation, and we offer our Oration with gratefull Adoration upon this Jollification.
The King composedly touches (or kicks) Cannings chin with his toe. Peeresses stand in a gallery across the north transept, holding their coronets. Above them is a second and more crowded gallery.
One of several satires on Canning as a jester or buffoon, the public was not aware of the King’s hostility to Canning.
BM 14199