Reading the Letter, or, the Broad-Bottomites Nonsuited. Feby. 1812

Tags: The Satirist Magazine .
Reading the Letter, or, the Broad-Bottomites Nonsuited. Feby. 1812
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Anon.
Reading the Letter, or, the Broad-Bottomites Nonsuited. Feby. 1812
London, The Satirist 1st. March 1812
Aquatint and etching
195 x 360 mm
Traces of old folds as issued.
£120
The Duke of York, on the right, in uniform, stands erect, in profile to the left reading a document a document to the closely grouped leaders of the Opposition. Behind him the Prince’s feathers and motto show that he is acting for the Regent. In front are Grenville and Grey; the former, clutching a handkerchief, supports himself on the back of a chair, thus accentuating his ‘broad bottom’ . He says : Oh! when shall we perform High Mass at Dropmore. Grey puts a hand on his shoulder. Behind them are Sheridan, who weeps, saying : It’s all up with us, and the bulky and spectacled Buckingham. Behind them are Whitbread, the only one who sits, with a Plan of Drury projecting from his pocket; he asks : Is poor dear Bony still to be thwarted? I’ll brew more mischief. Tierney, in profile to the left, clasps his hands, saying, A long farewell to all my hopes of greatness. Erskine, in barrister’s wig, registers acute melancholy. Moira, like Tierney, turning his back on the Duke, days : Why then to me this bustling world’s but Hell! Between the last two is a man with a large nose (? Ponsonby). A profile, saying Oh dear, may be that of Lauderdale. On the floor are a paper and book: The Cat let out of the Bag and Thoughts Regency. Behind, in an adjacent room, are other dismayed Whigs, including Lord Derby, vomiting. Behind these a cheering crowd is seen through an open door.
Many of the Opposotion, notably Whitbread, were in favour of peace, which must have been on Napoleon’s terms.
BM 11855