Promenade of Her Serene Highness the Duchess of Berri, & the Younger Branches of the Royal Family of France, on the Terrace of the Tuileries.

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Promenade of Her Serene Highness the Duchess of Berri, & the Younger Branches of the Royal Family of France, on the Terrace of the Tuileries.
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 Anon

Promenade of Her Serene Highness the Duchess of Berri, & the Younger Branches of the Royal Family of France, on the Terrace of the Tuileries.

London, W. Sams 1824

Aquatint

Original hand-colouring

230x300mm

£100

An interesting aquatint, only semi caricatured, showing the widowed Duchesse de Berry walking with her family, their nursemaid and attendant officers in the gardens of the Tuileries Palace, Paris. The young and beautiful Duchess wears a blue dress, a veil secured by a coronet of roses in her hair and carries a parasol in one hand and holds the hand of her daughter Louise with the other. Her youngest child, born posthumously after his father’s assassination in 1820, is carried along in his nurse’s arms. On the left is a soldier carrying a musket and bayonet and in the background is a garden pavilion. Charles-Ferdinand de Bourbon, Duc de Berry (1778-1820), was taken abroad by his father, the Comte d'Artois (afterward Charles X of France), at the outbreak of the French Revolution in 1789. He served in the Prince de Condé's army and went with Condé to Russia, where the Tsar Paul gave him a cavalry regiment. From 1801 to 1814, however, he lived in England. There he began a liaison with an Englishwoman, Emma (Amy) Brown, by whom he had two daughters (afterward Baronne de Charette and Comtesse de Faucigny-Lucinge). Having returned to France in 1815, Berry (an unheroic figure) retired to Ghent during the Hundred Days, but returned again to Paris at the Second Restoration. On June 17th 1816, he married Carolina Maria, eldest daughter of Francis I of the Two Sicilies (by whom he had one daughter, Louise, later Duchess and Regent of Parma). On Feb. 13th 1820, as he was leaving the Paris Opéra, he was mortally  wounded by an insane saddler, Louis-Pierre Louvel. He died the next day. His posthumous son, the Duc de Bordeaux (later Comte de Chambord), represented the last hope for the Bourbon dynasty. His wife survived him for many years, dying in 1870.